Moncton adults must wear helmets to skate in arenas next year


This child is wearing a Canadian Standards Association-approved helmet. Soon, grown ups in Moncton will need 1 as …Ice skaters in Moncton, N. B., better hope they get a Canadian Standards Association-approved hockey helmet regarding Christmas, because without 1 they will be unwelcome on town ice rinks.

As of Jan. 1, 2014, every adult who skates in a Moncton arena is going to be required to wear helmets.

The official policy says:


Almost all participants during ice associated activities at all City of Moncton ice skating arenas shall wear a Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved protective headgear for ice sports.

Children beneath the age of 12 are already needed to wear the safety equipment when skating, but the new law will extend the order to everyone of each age and every skill level. Wayne Gretzky can pack up and obtain out of town if he doesn’t comply.

“We feel it’s our role to be as wise and proactive as we may to make our recreational services as safe as we possibly can, ” Moncton Leisure Solutions Director Jocelyn Cohoon told CTV Atlantic.

[ Related: Bodychecking ban gets mixed reaction at Challenge Cup ]

The city is picking its battles, nevertheless. Realizing it would be too hard to enforce on outdoor rinks, its will focus only on indoor city-run arenas.

Other exclusions do exist. Those registered along with Skate Canada who have finished the Can Skate plan are free to risk their own skins by not wearing protection. Quebec Major Younger Hockey League related events are somehow protected from the law, as are Skate North america sanctioned events.

Some might cynically query whether skater safety or even security from litigation will be the primary reason for the modify. If it really is safety, there is such a thing as going too far.

Culture can’t keep everyone secure from everything. Teens prohibited from tanning beds, trees cut down to protect one child from allergies. Bike helmets, seatbelts. On a case-by-case base, mandated safety standards are reasonable to the point of apparent. Piled on top of one another, it seems obsessive.

The particular National Post’ s Matt Gurney jokes that the next step is going to be Moncton making life vests a requirement when going swimming in city pools.

“Moncton is now efficiently deeming every citizen to be in as much need of the state’s protection as a child just learning how to skate, ” Gurney writes. “This is infantilizing to all who enjoy hitting the glaciers for a free skate occasionally, and Monctonians should have simply no part of it. ”

[ More Brew: Daniel Dale’s reluctant decision to sue Mayor Rob Ford ]

The fact is that these are city-run arenas and politicians are free to implement any safety standards they see as necessary. Those who don’t like it can go elsewhere.

That begs the question exactly why such facilities are necessary to begin with. To promote physical activity? Community constructing? Creating laws that frighten people away seems counter-intuitive.

Want to know what information is brewing in North america?
Follow @MRCoutts upon Twitter


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This child is wearing a Canadian Standards Association-approved helmet. Soon, grown ups in Moncton will need 1 as …Ice skaters in Moncton, N. B., better hope they get a Canadian Standards Association-approved hockey helmet regarding Christmas, because without 1 they will be unwelcome on town ice rinks.

As of Jan. 1, 2014, every adult who skates in a Moncton arena is going to be required to wear helmets.

The official policy says:


Almost all participants during ice associated activities at all City of Moncton ice skating arenas shall wear a Canadian Standards Association (CSA) approved protective headgear for ice sports.

Children beneath the age of 12 are already needed to wear the safety equipment when skating, but the new law will extend the order to everyone of each age and every skill level. Wayne Gretzky can pack up and obtain out of town if he doesn’t comply.

“We feel it’s our role to be as wise and proactive as we may to make our recreational services as safe as we possibly can, ” Moncton Leisure Solutions Director Jocelyn Cohoon told CTV Atlantic.

[ Related: Bodychecking ban gets mixed reaction at Challenge Cup ]

The city is picking its battles, nevertheless. Realizing it would be too hard to enforce on outdoor rinks, its will focus only on indoor city-run arenas.

Other exclusions do exist. Those registered along with Skate Canada who have finished the Can Skate plan are free to risk their own skins by not wearing protection. Quebec Major Younger Hockey League related events are somehow protected from the law, as are Skate North america sanctioned events.

Some might cynically query whether skater safety or even security from litigation will be the primary reason for the modify. If it really is safety, there is such a thing as going too far.

Culture can’t keep everyone secure from everything. Teens prohibited from tanning beds, trees cut down to protect one child from allergies. Bike helmets, seatbelts. On a case-by-case base, mandated safety standards are reasonable to the point of apparent. Piled on top of one another, it seems obsessive.

The particular National Post’ s Matt Gurney jokes that the next step is going to be Moncton making life vests a requirement when going swimming in city pools.

“Moncton is now efficiently deeming every citizen to be in as much need of the state’s protection as a child just learning how to skate, ” Gurney writes. “This is infantilizing to all who enjoy hitting the glaciers for a free skate occasionally, and Monctonians should have simply no part of it. ”

[ More Brew: Daniel Dale’s reluctant decision to sue Mayor Rob Ford ]

The fact is that these are city-run arenas and politicians are free to implement any safety standards they see as necessary. Those who don’t like it can go elsewhere.

That begs the question exactly why such facilities are necessary to begin with. To promote physical activity? Community constructing? Creating laws that frighten people away seems counter-intuitive.

Want to know what information is brewing in North america?
Follow @MRCoutts upon Twitter