Latvian player gets 18-month doping ban


License-plate readers that will scan passing cars plus instantly match them to unlawful databases have moved rapidly from sci-fi concept in order to daily reality, even in small towns. And just as quickly, privacy advocates have raised problems about the systems, asking that has access, how long the data will get stored and what kind of limitations law enforcement should face for their use. But one private firm that’s building its own database of license dish snapshots has started pressing back against such problems, lobbying against bills that will limit its business and also saying it’s First Variation rights could be at stake.


-+011000110+-

License-plate readers that scan passing vehicles and instantly match them to criminal databases have shifted quickly from sci-fi concept to daily reality, even in small towns. And just as quickly, privacy advocates have raised concerns about the systems, requesting who has access, how long the data gets stored and what type of limits law enforcement should face for their use. But a single private firm that’s building its own database of permit plate snapshots has started pushing back against such concerns, lobbying against expenses that would limit its business and even saying it’s 1st Amendment rights could be on the line.